ARTICLES BY Duke Magazine Staff

  • Fossils
    November 19, 2013
    There’s an eerie elegance to the old bones of the Palaeopropithecus sloth lemur. Perhaps 8,000 years ago, the (then-living) lemur hung upside down in Madagascar. Nowadays, its skeleton rests like a hidden treasure at Duke’s Division of Fossil Primates on Broad Street, among more than 25,000 other fossils of the earliest primates and animals.
  • Matt Koidin
    November 19, 2013
    Sterly Wilder ’83, associate vice president for alumni affairs, talks with Matt Koidin M.B.A. ’05, co-chair of DukeGEN and chief technology officer of Pocket. SW: How has Duke become more interested in entrepreneurship?
  • November 19, 2013
    Whether you’re navigating the early stages of your professional career, experiencing a major life transition, or pursuing deeper engagement with issues that matter to you, the Duke Alumni Association’s 2014 Women’s Weekend promises insights, inspiration, and expert advice.
  • November 12, 2013
    The popular perception of plastic is that it’s not the most resilient material we have at our disposal when it comes to wear and tear.
  • November 12, 2013
    Intolerance, Mahatma Gandhi once said, is a form of violence and an obstacle to a true democratic spirit. Although those words weren’t repeated at the late-September opening of the new Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, it seemed a sentiment with which attendees would concur.
  • November 12, 2013
    Since launching in 2007, DukeEngage has aimed to give students an immersive experience that enhances them and community partners. In October, the initiative added four programs to its roster of thirty-six, allowing students to go deep into the culture and issues of cities in the U.S. and abroad. Students—up to eight in each program—can now engage in Detroit; Miami; Belgrade, Serbia; and Seoul, South Korea.
  • November 12, 2013
    In a university of high achievers, class rankings can have real import. That’s why Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering are changing the approach to communicating student class rank based on grade point average.
  • November 12, 2013
    In the ongoing conversation about the value of studying the arts and the humanities, some critics have pointed to the solitary nature of the humanist and the seemingly difficult marketability of a graduate with a humanities major as minuses.
  • November 12, 2013
    You might not think of former CIA director and retired Army General David Petraeus as a jokester, and it’s probably best that you don’t. Yet when he visited campus in September for a question-and-answer session, he drew laughs with a joke about what happened (at a bar) when a Duke student asked a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student if he wanted to hear a joke about UNC. (Let’s just say it wasn’t favorable to UNC.)
  • November 12, 2013
    During the second quarter of this year’s football homecoming game against Troy University, Michael Holyfield ’79 finally got the respect he deserved. The first African-American Duke Blue Devil mascot was given a letterman jacket by the athletics department. “We wanted to honor him and the historical contributions he made,” said Jon Jackson, associate director of athletics for external affairs, in a statement.
  • November 12, 2013
    Even Blake S. Wilson B.S.E.E. ’74 is in awe of the cochlear implant, and the electrical engineer is one of the core developers of the device. “Most of today’s implanted patients can understand everyday speech with hearing alone, without lip reading—many in noisy environments, some even on the telephone.
  • Duke Kunshan
    November 12, 2013
    More than 800 students from China enrolled at Duke last year, a clear indication of the university’s popularity in the nation. Now, after gaining the approval of the Ministry of Education, Duke will have a formal home in the country.
  • November 12, 2013
    Pleas for greater transparency could be this era’s most consistent cri de coeur. It’s certainly the call of DukeOpen, a student coalition that aims to increase the transparency of the university’s endowment. And while the group’s mission hasn’t been accomplished, its calls have brought change.
  • November 12, 2013
    In her first documentary, The Lottery, director-producer Madeleine Sackler ’05 explored the controversy surrounding the role of charter schools in America’s public-education system. Now she’s turned her lens to protest art and political tyranny in Eastern Europe.
  • Provost Peter Lange
    November 12, 2013
    He’s a political scientist, yet when folks seek to describe Peter Lange in his role as provost, the word most often used is “architect.” And so, as he prepares to step down in June 2014 and design the next chapter of his life, Lange is being lauded for the relationships he helped forge, the global bridges he helped champion, and the campus growth he helped spur.
  • Test tubes for blood testing
    November 12, 2013
    There’s a significant difference between a bacterial infection and a viral infection, and, apparently, not discerning the difference has serious consequences. Although their symptoms are comparable to those of bacterial infections, viral infections cannot be treated by antibiotics like your typical Z-Pak. So when a patient sick with a virus takes an antibiotic, it allows certain bacteria in the body to strengthen and mutate.
  • Women sunbathing on a beach
    November 12, 2013
    We’re all too familiar with the symptoms of prolonged exposure to UV rays. There’s the crimson skin, the itchiness, and of course, that overpowering feeling of lethargy. But what actually makes the skin hurt to the touch? A Duke researcher believes he has an answer for sunburned beachgoers: TRPV4.
  • November 12, 2013
    Mbaye Lo, assistant professor of the practice of Asian & Middle Eastern studies and leader of this past summer’s DukeEngage in Cairo program, reflected during that time about Egypt and the rest of the Middle East. He believes the dreams of the 2011 Arab Spring are still alive, but that Egyptians are in a state of “political exhaustion.”
  • November 12, 2013
    Psychologists have long recognized the importance of embarrassment as a human emotion—its anticipation alone can moderate social behavior. Why, then, are spouses so quick to make each other blush?
  • Menu
    November 12, 2013
    Tourists bring them home as travel keepsakes. But for ecologists tracking fish populations, menus are serving a wider purpose. Menus taken as souvenirs from seafood restaurants in Hawaii have helped a team of researchers glean important insights into the historical trajectory of the state’s fisheries. A critical part of that history—a span of forty-five years in the middle of the twentieth century—is obscured by the lack of official records.
  • A photo of the pages of a book
    September 19, 2013
  • Pleiades Gallery logo
    September 19, 2013
    At the opening of Pleiades Gallery’s exhibition “Truth to Power” this summer, patrons included prize-winning architects, Duke professors, community activists, tattooed artists, blues musicians, local politicians, and curious passersby on their way to one of downtown Durham’s many hip restaurants.
  • September 19, 2013
    By the time Doris Duke arrived in Hawaii, at the end of her honeymoon with James Cromwell in 1935, she had already begun planning a home in Palm Beach, Florida. Yet from the moment her feet hit the sand, Doris felt at home in the lush natural beauty and laidback rhythms of the remote territory. She also relished the quiet solitude the island offered. As the only daughter of James B. “Buck” Duke, Doris had inherited what would amount to $80 million from her father’s estate.
  • Modern woman
    September 19, 2013
    From the top of her perfectly coiffed head to the tips of her teeny-tiny toes, Barbie has become an iconic symbol of idealized—albeit unrealistic—feminine beauty. She has endured equal measures of adulation and criticism, from having her portrait painted by Andy Warhol to being banned in Saudi Arabia to inspiring countless doctoral dissertations on body image and femininity.
  • September 19, 2013
    Deborah Lee James ’79 was nominated by President Barack Obama in August to be the nation’s next Air Force Secretary. If confirmed by the Senate, she would become only the second female secretary in the Air Force’s history and among the few female senior civilian leaders of an armed-services branch.
  • Photo Lesley Jane Seymour ’78
    September 19, 2013
    SW: What made you decide to attend Duke? LJS: I had gone to a boarding school that was a feeder school for Wellesley. But I wanted to take a different route. When I visited Duke, I looked up Chapel Drive, and I said to myself, “This is what college is supposed to look like.” 
  • Photo of Max Kramer
    September 19, 2013
    WHO: Max Kramer
  • September 19, 2013
    During a recent deployment to Afghanistan, Phil Cotter B.M.E. ’10 and Seth Brown B.M.E. ’09 were brainstorming ways to honor members of the armed forces, past and present. They decided to draw on their shared history at Duke and reached out to other members of their Blue Devil ROTC battalion, all of whom are active-duty officers. Before long the idea for The Freedom 500 was hatched.
  • Photo of construction cone
    September 17, 2013
    At press time, campus roads were a hodgepodge of orange cones, dusty digging vehicles, and neon-clad traffic-directing construction workers. Renovations are plentiful. Here’s an update on two of the projects:
  • September 17, 2013
    Your aching back might get some relief if a new biomaterial from Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering succeeds in its intention. In a study, graduate student Aubrey Francisco and biomedical engineering professor Lori Setton describe a material designed to deliver a booster shot of reparative cells to the nucleus pulposus (NP), the jelly-like cushion found between spinal discs.
  • Photo of Murali Doraiswamy
    September 17, 2013
    The director of the Neurocognitive Disorders Program in Psychiatry at the School of Medicine, Murali Doraiswamy is a leading Alzheimer’s expert and coauthor of The Alzheimer’s Action Plan. In a recent interview on PBS’ Newshour, Doraiswamy discussed new research that shows that rates of severe memory loss appear to be decreasing in consecutive generations. On the hopeful signs of the studies:
  • Brain
    September 17, 2013
    The standard treatment for glioblastoma, the most common, aggressive, and typically fatal type of brain cancer, is surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Yet employing the grueling trio rarely brings success; tumors recur in 95 percent of cases, nearly half within eight weeks of treatment.
  • September 17, 2013
    It may not sound as appealing as turning water into wine, but turning human waste into clean water, energy, and useful byproducts is arguably as impressive—and can have longer-lasting health benefits. Duke engineers, working with a team from the University of Missouri, are working on a prototype of a self-contained “‘toilet” unit that will have the capacity to handle the daily fecal waste of about 1,200 users at a cost of less than a nickel per person per day.
  • Photo of a peacock
    September 17, 2013
    With apologies to the toucan and parrot, a peacock’s plumage ranks highest on the aviary beauty scale. Yet those colorful contenders might find solace in this: Ms. Peacock may not be as impressed with the display as Mr. Peacock is.
  • Bethzaida Fernandez, a lecturer in the Spanish language program
    September 17, 2013
    Students wanted Bethzaida Fernandez, a lecturer in the Spanish language program, to take them home—not to her place in Durham but to her native Costa Rica. For the past two years, with a small grant from the Romance studies department, Fernandez has done just that.
  • September 17, 2013
    You may have noticed a painful erosion of your local newspaper as the print media industry grapples with issues like soaring newsprint prices, slumping ad sales, and circulation declines.
  • Stick figures
    September 17, 2013
    Student unhappiness about the handling of sexual-assault cases on college campuses nationally has led to sometimes loud, sometimes litigious conflicts. Duke students, too, have voiced their concerns, and in July, those concerns led to change.
  • Photo of person studying with a laptop
    September 17, 2013
    After a debate described as both passionate and civil, the Arts and Sciences Council declined Duke’s involvement in a pilot project offering for-credit online courses. The 16-14 vote (with two abstentions) reflected concerns expressed in April by council members that the proposal to work with the private, for-profit company 2U had not received a thorough vetting from faculty.
  • President Brodhead with The New York Times’ David Brooks
    September 17, 2013
    Great minds, they say, think alike, and the fifty-three impressive minds that converged for the Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences agreed that both fields are key to the nation’s future. Indeed, the group, co-chaired by Duke president Richard H. Brodhead, went further, releasing in June “The Heart of the Matter,” a report offering three goals and thirteen recommendations for advancing the humanities and social sciences.
  • The lobby of Duke Medicine Pavilion
    September 17, 2013
    The term “medical pavilion” doesn’t typically conjure up notions of comfort, yet much of the conversation surrounding the late-June opening of the Duke Medicine Pavilion seemed to be about the eight-floor, 608,000-square-foot center’s cozy allure.
  • Graduate student Nathan Landy with the cloaking device.
    September 17, 2013
    As origin stories go, the one behind Duke electrical engineering graduate student Nathan Landy’s involvement in a White House-sponsored panel is pretty mundane. No planets exploding. No radioactive insect bites. Just an e-mail request sent from a White House staffer in June.
  • Sosin scrutinizing papyri
    September 17, 2013
    The ancient and the modern come together in a new appointment at Duke. In July, Joshua D. Sosin Ph.D. ’00, an associate professor of classical studies and history, became the director of the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing, a new digital-humanities unit of Duke University Libraries. More impressive: Sosin is the first tenured faculty member at Duke to have a joint appointment in the library and an academic department.
  • Photo of a spotlight
    July 26, 2013
    Laine Wagenseller ’90 felt helpless when he first met Adolf Baguma during a service trip to rural Uganda. Orphaned as a young child, Baguma had suffered debilitating burns when a teenage aunt threw scalding banana leaves on him as punishment for trying to get food. Baguma couldn’t walk upright—his legs were twisted by fused scar tissue—so he got from place to place by scooting himself along on all fours.
  • Sketch of a teacher
    July 26, 2013
    The new class of Duke Alumni Faculty Fellows includes a pioneer in the field of black popular culture, a law school faculty member who has worked on Supreme Court confirmation hearings, a scholar of applied and theoretical ethics, and a biomedical engineer specializing in biomaterials.
  • July 26, 2013
     Research by Matti Darden, Duke University Archives staff, and Sam Hull.  View the timeline in PDF form.
  • Cameron
    July 25, 2013
     Andresen
  • Image of a teacher
    July 25, 2013
    MEDICINE
  • Lawson and his colleagues implant the bioengineered blood vessel.
    July 25, 2013
    In a first-of-its-kind operation in the U.S., a team of Duke doctors helped create a bioengineered blood vessel and transplanted it into the arm of a patient with end-stage kidney disease. The procedure, the first U.S. clinical trial to test the safety and effectiveness of the bioengineered blood vessel, is a milestone in the field of tissue engineering. The new vein is human cell-based product with no biological properties that would cause organ rejection.
  • Image of game controller
    July 25, 2013
    It’s every kid’s dream come true: science supporting the idea that playing video games improves brain functions. Researchers from Duke’s Visual Cognition Lab found that hours spent with video-gaming consoles likely train the brain to make better and faster use of visual input. “Gamers see the world differently,” says Greg Appelbaum, an assistant professor of psychiatry in the Duke School of Medicine. “They are able to extract more information from a visual scene.”
  • Image of brain shaped like a heart
    July 25, 2013
    On the HGTV show House Hunters, prospective buyers choose from several home options. The final decision comes down not just to cost, but also to the emotional investment potential homeowners have in a particular property. That link between emotions and perceived value is powerful—and Duke researchers have discovered why.
  • July 25, 2013
    It may be quiet on campus, but the $3.25 billion Duke Forward campaign has kept activity humming during the summer. First, trustee emeritus Morris Williams ’62, M.A.T. ’63 and his wife, Ruth, pledged $5 million to Duke athletics. It’s the fourth commitment of $5 million or more to athletics since last October.
  • Seal of the State of North Carolina
    July 25, 2013
    In response to North Carolina’s newly conservative legislature, several Duke professors have been participating— and getting arrested—in weekly rallies in Raleigh. Known as Moral Mondays, the rallies have drawn several thousand protesters, including faculty members from other universities as well as students and clergy members, who have assembled each week since late April.
  • Scroth: Nasher leader. Photo by Chris Hildreth
    July 25, 2013
    Sarah Schroth, the Nancy Hanks Senior Curator at Duke’s Nasher Museum of Art, is the museum’s new director. Schroth has been serving as its interim director since November. She succeeds Kimerly Rorschach as the Mary D.B.T. and James H. Semans Director of the museum. An expert on Spanish art of the seventeenth century, Schroth joined the Duke University Museum of Art—as it was then known—in 1995.
  • Happy day: graduates celebrate the end of one chapter, and the start of the next. Jon Gardiner
    July 25, 2013
    More than 5,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students were awarded their degrees during Duke’s 161st commencement in May.
  • Image of an arrow
    July 25, 2013
    Growing up in New York in the 1970s, Michael Marsicano ’78, M.Ed. ’78, Ph.D. ’82 loved the English horn and the oboe. But with his sights set on medical school, he couldn’t see himself going to a conservatory. Instead, he chose Duke—a place known for training doctors that also had an outstanding wind symphony. Under the leadership of longtime music professor Paul Bryan, Michael went to Vienna with the Wind Symphony for a semester-long study-abroad program and concert tour.
  • (Courtesy: Nasher Museum of Art)
    May 24, 2013
    Marriage of Jupiter and Juno (c. 1720-30), by Nicola Maria Rossi, is in the Nasher Museum’s permanent collection. Floating in the clouds at the center of a swirling entourage of winged attendants, the Roman gods Jupiter and Juno are joined in marriage by the young torch-carrying Hymenaus, god of weddings.
  • (Credit: Duke University Archives)
    May 24, 2013
    The Bryan University Center is full of campus activity, and it will be even more so once the West Campus Union closes for renovation this summer. With performance spaces, meeting rooms, student activities, the University Stores, and dining, it is an essential part of student life today. It might be surprising that the long saga of its construction makes it one of the campus’ most-debated and most-anticipated buildings.
  • Photos by Alex Maness.
    May 21, 2013
    How do Americans come together - and fall apart? That question fuels the works produced by Hoi Polloi, an Obie-winning New York-based theater collaborative.
  • May 16, 2013
      BASKETBALL:
  • Image of spotlight
    May 15, 2013
      Peng Shi '10 (Credit: Gretchen Ert/The New York Times/Redux)
  • 50th logo
    May 15, 2013
    As part of the university’s 50th anniversary of black students at Duke, a number of regional events are setting the stage for alumni to explore the past and future of Duke’s commitment to issues of race relations and diversity.
  • Road Scholars: Hare, Moffitt, Strandberg, and Wallace share their expertise with alumni audiences. (Credits: Christer Berg, Razorfilms, Victor Strandberg, Alana Damron)
    May 15, 2013
    Although still in its pilot year, the Duke Alumni Association’s Faculty Fellows program already has been well-received. With enthusiastic buy-in from the initial class of fellows to growing demand from regional Duke chapters for continued intellectual engagement with the university, the initiative formalizes an integral component of the DAA’s Forever Learning focus.
  • Future champs: Ogelsby rallies a passel of All West Lacrosse players. Photo courtesy of Matt Ogelsby.
    May 15, 2013
    As East Coast-West Coast rivalries go, the quest to produce the nation’s top varsity lacrosse players is decidedly lopsided. Lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the country, exploding at every level of play, from youth leagues to competitive high-school teams to clubs. Still, the country’s top athletes and colle- giate programs historically have been rooted along the Atlantic.
  • Addisu: Traded briefcase for beats. Credit: Vinny Picone and Phillip Annand of the Madbury Club.
    May 15, 2013
  • Engaging artists: Milazzo, right, in conversation with actor Willem Dafoe as part of the Film: Masters series. Credit: Oriel Pe'er/The Modern School of Film.
    May 15, 2013
    Robert Milazzo is a patient, persistent man. Back in the late ’90s, as he was figuring out how to break into the film business, he made it his mission to somehow connect with Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright/screenwriter/director David Mamet.
  • Image of the Plaza at the new Bryan Center
    May 14, 2013
    Renovations to the Bryan Center began during the 2012 winter break and are expected to be completed by fall 2013. The changes are designed to create more appealing and flexible spaces for students and staff members. This is the first major renovation since its construction more than thirty years ago. Here are a few changes to look forward to:
  • Credit: Les Todd.
    May 14, 2013
    Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, former national-security assistant under President Gerald Ford and President George H.W. Bush, as well as former military assistant to President Richard Nixon LL.B. ’37, at the Washington Duke Inn. He spoke about foreign-policy challenges.
  • Don't blink: Ben Ramsey '15 has a staring contest with three girls in Kuwdé, a small village in northern Togo. Credit: Maria Romano '14.
    May 14, 2013
      Though this summer marks the inaugural DukeEngage program in Togo, its faculty director is quite established in the West African country. Since the mid-1980s, cultural anthropology professor Charles Piot has studied the politics, economies, and traditions of the Togolese people, conducting his twice-a-year fieldwork primarily in northern rural villages.
  • Image of diploma
    May 14, 2013
    Eight U.S. universities, including Duke, have established the Vest Scholarship program, a “reverse Rhodes Scholarship,” to spur international collaborations among graduate students whose studies are focused on tackling some of the world’s biggest engineering challenges.
  • Duke Global Health Institute logo
    May 14, 2013
    Global health has grown from a certificate program in 2006 to a full major, albeit one offered only as part of a double-major program of study. The major offers students a multifaceted approach to global health challenges and is one of the country’s first liberal-arts majors in global health.
  • A new tack: Docking in a different port. Credit: Scott Taylor.
    May 14, 2013
    After nearly thirty-two years of service, the Cape Hatteras has spent its last day at sea, at least under Duke’s command. The research vessel, which Duke received from the National Science Foundation in 1980, has been sold for $900,000 to the Cape Fear Community College in Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • May 14, 2013
    The catalyst: Assistant professor of chemistry and physics Patrick Charbonneau and visiting chef Justine de Valicourt not only share a history (Charbonneau and de Valicourt first met in their native Québec), but also a passion for cuisine. After a year of brainstorming, they are hitting the kitchen to cook up a freshman seminar class that infuses scientific savvy into tasty payoffs.
  • Image of 2 people talking
    May 14, 2013
    Future Blue Devils may soon greet each other with “Kusu dewo?” thanks to a new exchange program with the University of Virginia aimed at broadening the availability of low-visibility languages. Starting this fall, students in Durham will be able to take Tibetan-language classes, and students in Charlottesville will be able to enroll in Duke’s Creole courses.
  • May 14, 2013
    This was one commencement address not bound to be bobbing in the sea of the forgettable. It would not be especially “fun or breezy or grandly inspirational,” as the speaker (and the cultural phenomenon), David Foster Wallace, told Kenyon College seniors in 2005.
  • Looking homeward: Masaai tribe member Mepukori aspires to bring improved health-care services to her native Kenyans. Credit: Megan Morr.
    May 14, 2013
    Duke students traverse all sorts of distances before setting foot on campus, but few have covered as much cultural and geographic ground as Nash Mepukori.
  • Photos by Donn Young
    May 14, 2013
    Andrew Fontanella could be forgiven for wanting to be somewhere else. At six foot three, with a tousle of curly dark-brown hair that adds another inch or two, he looms above everyone else in this cramped second-floor classroom in the generically named Medical Sciences Research Building on Research Drive. It’s 11:30 on a windy Wednesday morning in March, and Fontanella keeps an eye on the clock.
  • Photo of college graduates
    May 14, 2013
    “Why College May Not Be Worth It”—CNBC, August 10, 2012 “Saying No to College”—The New York Times, November 30, 2012 “Is College Worth It?”—Forbes, December 4, 2012
  • Photo of a lonely child
    May 14, 2013
    We all know bullying is painful to endure, but new research shows that bullied children are at a greater risk of developing anxiety disorders, depression, and suicidal thoughts as adults. “We were surprised at how profoundly bullying affects a person’s long-term functioning,” says William E. Copeland, assistant clinical professor in the psychiatry department. “This psychological damage doesn’t just go away because a person grew up and is no longer bullied.”
  • Photo of Steven and Rebecca Jensen Scott
    May 14, 2013
    Sports medicine at Duke—a division of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery—will get a boost through a $20 million gift from Steven and Rebecca Jensen Scott. The gift will expand clinical and research program development, faculty recruitment and retention, and support for sports-medicine training, as well as providing support from the medical school. This is among several significant gifts for Duke Forward, the $3.25 billion fundraising campaign launched last September.
  • Image of people with thought bubbles
    May 14, 2013
    True or false: Women are more in touch with their emotions. Immigrants work harder than the native population. Answer: It doesn’t matter, because positive stereotypes like these are more underhanded than their negative counterparts.
  • Cowan: a call to level the educational playing field. Credit: Jared Lazarus.
    May 14, 2013
    During a rousing keynote speech at April’s Reunions Weekend, U.S. Senator William “Mo” Cowan ’91 deftly combined the personal and political as part of the university’s “Celebrating the Past, Charting the Future: Commemorating 50 Years of Black Students at Duke.” His talk in Page Auditorium touched on the legacy of African-American students at Duke, his own campus experiences, and the imperative of providing high-quality education for minority students.
  • Duke Energy Initiative logo
    May 14, 2013
    The former head of the U.S. Energy Information Administration and current director of the Duke University Energy Initiative, Richard Newell researches and analyzes the economics of energy policy. In a recent Office Hours interview, the Gendell Associate Professor of energy and environmental economics discusses the myth of American energy independence and offers insight into current U.S. energy debates.
  • May 14, 2013
    1. It really is a popularity contest: Rhesus macaques that have large, strong social networks tend to belong to families of similarly amiable macaques. Not only that, but playing nice with others tends to yield greater reproductive success. A corollary shows that the most aggressive monkeys have greater reproductive success—but so do the most passive monkeys. The loser? The monkey in the middle.
  • May 14, 2013
    Let’s face it: Warnings regarding teenage smoking are as earth-shattering as those about alcohol’s deleterious effects behind the wheel. But new research from a team of U.S., U.K., and New Zealand geneticists adds an interesting caveat to the common wisdom. It turns out that teenagers with high-risk genetic profiles for becoming heavy smokers are far more likely to become addicted to smoking and have a harder time quitting as adults than those without the same precondition.
  • Credit: Marshall Sokoloff/Corbis
    May 14, 2013
  • February 13, 2013
    Birds do it. People do it. Now, Duke researchers are convinced that mice, too, can learn how to imitate songs to woo a mate. The surprising conclusion comes from a team of Duke neurobiologists who observed that male mice imitate the ultrasonic squeakings of other males. The researchers identified certain features in a mouse’s brain that are similar to the parts of the brain humans and birds use to learn vocalization, which suggests mice can pick up a tune.
  • February 13, 2013
    So you’ve settled into the bathroom for a few minutes only to realize—too late!—you have nothing to read. Bryan Silverman ’15 and his brother Jordan share your frustration. It’s why they started Star Toilet Paper, toilet paper with advertisements printed on recycled paper in safety-tested, vegetable oil-based ink (like common printed napkins). Don’t turn your nose up, though. The idea was compelling enough for Silverman to be named Entrepreneur Magazine’s “College Entrepreneur of 2012.”
  • February 13, 2013
    Newly arrived at Duke from King’s College in London, Luke Bretherton brings a fresh perspective on how Christian churches and faith-based causes intermesh with American political life. In a recent Office Hours interview, Bretherton, an associate professor of theological ethics and a senior fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, describes four key “temptations” that pose problems for the church as it carries out its public ministry.
  • February 13, 2013
    As winter recedes, millions of Americans renew their pledges to eat better and exercise more. And hundreds of scientists work to discover the keys to make those efforts more successful. Here’s the latest on what Duke researchers are learning about maintaining a healthy body:
  • February 13, 2013
    In the ongoing struggle to find a better way to treat cancer, the hopes of doctors and patients have been buoyed recently by the revival of an old idea—using the body’s immune responses to attack tumors. But while immunotherapies have shown tantalizing promise, they’ve presented frustrating problems. In some cases, the immune system waged attack on healthy tissues and organs, as well.
  • Circle of concern: gathering to proclaim "Race Is Not a Party" (Credit: Megan Morr)
    February 13, 2013
    About 200 people participated in an early-February protest sparked by a fraternity party that they said denigrated Asians. The protest sought to hold Kappa Sigma responsible for its “Asia Prime” party; the invitation to the party included stereotypical representations of Asian people and language.
  • Mayer retraced his grandfather's life, including his escape from a Nazi labor camp during World War II
    February 13, 2013
    David Mayer never knew much about his grandfather, Paul. He knew his grandfather had escaped a Nazi labor camp in eastern Germany during World War II and emigrated to the U.S. in 1949. But Paul Mayer died in 1985, before David was born. The reality of that experience remained distant for David—until he found a translation of his grandfather’s journal.
  • February 13, 2013
    LACROSSE: Lacrosse players Casey Carroll ’07, Jake Tripucka ’13, and David Lawson ’13 were selected in the 2013 Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft. The 18th overall pick, Carroll is pursuing a master’s degree at the Fuqua Business School after serving multiple tours of duty as an Army ranger in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • February 13, 2013
    For Aisha Taylor ’05, Duke provided a clear life-changing experience: a “Women as Leaders” course. The course was taught by Betsy Alden ’64, who spearheaded service-learning at Duke and is now an adjunct lecturing fellow in the Program in Education. Alden also helped start Duke Alums Engage, which plans service experiences for alumni in dozens of cities each year.
  • February 13, 2013
    Steve Johnson M.H.S. ’02 is the new artist-relations’ manager for MerleFest, a four-day celebration of bluegrass, old-time music, Americana, country, blues, and rock. He’ll be in charge of selecting and scheduling the nearly 100 artists who perform on fourteen stages during the April event in Wilkesboro, North Carolina. MerleFest was founded in 1988 in memory of the late Eddy Merle Watson, son of Doc Watson, the American music legend who died this past May.
  • February 13, 2013
    When the Swiss-based group ensemBle baBel began planning its headline presentation for the 20 Heures de Musiques-Romont music festival this past fall, it first considered performing a work by avant-garde French composer Erik Satie, whose abstract, minimalist works have inspired artists ranging from John Cage and Philip Glass to Coldplay and Lana del Ray.

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