ARTICLES BY Paul Baerman M.B.A. '90

  • October 1, 2011
      One hears, on campus and beyond, a longing for more systemic innovation in secondary education—change that could perhaps build on the success of Duke’s Talent Identification Program (TIP).
  • Each summer, Duke’s Talent Identification Program brings some of the nation’s smartest teenagers to campus for a jump start on college-level coursework. But the most important thing they learn may be that they’re not alone.
    October 1, 2011
      Lacey Chylack
  • Amateur professionals: members of the DUSS Youth Symphony Orchestra, overleaf; Kitchen, conducting center, demands that her students approach music as a dedicated pursuit, not a recreational activity
    October 1, 2007
  • March 31, 2004
    Herbie Hancock uses his hands and feet when he talks. When he says the word guitar, his hands strum an imaginary Fender. When he says record, his finger makes a needle and spins. Meanwhile he paces, gravitating back toward the piano keyboard again and again, though he doesn't touch it. He walks partway around the big Steinway grand. Lightly strokes its raised lid. Sits on the bench. Home base.
  • October 1, 2003
    Hunting Midnight By Richard Zimler '77. Delacorte Press, 2003. 512 pages. $24.95. Last of the Amazons By Steven Pressfield '65. Bantam Dell Publishing Group, 2003. 416 pages. $13.95, paper.
  • "We spend a lot of time thinking about the economics of what we do, and trying to balance that with our reason for existence, which is to publish scholarship.  We give people tenure." -KEN WISSOKER, Editor-in-Chief. Photo: Chris Hildreth
    June 1, 2003
    You might imagine that running a university press would be like playing the stock market, angling for the big win: You patiently invest in scholars, waiting for the one book that will take the intellectual marketplace by storm, dictate a new wave of public policy, or anticipate the next Big Idea.
  • June 1, 2002
     
  • March 31, 2002
     
  • The quartet in rehearsal: from left, Eric Pritchard, Hsiao-Mei Ku, Jonathan Bagg, and Fred Raimi. Les Todd.
    November 30, 2001
    Four hundred rapt listeners in Reynolds Auditorium hold their breath. The luminous personalities of the players flicker gradually through the great nexus of sound: the violist hearty and good-natured, the cellist insistent, one violinist passionately partisan, the other calmly engaged.
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